Posted by: faithful | May 11, 2011

linking food and mood

Eat Well when Dealing with Depression

The Link Between Food & Your Mood

— By Becky Hand, Licensed & Registered Dietitian

Although the foods you eat cannot treat depression, your diet does have significant effects on your mood, energy levels, mental health, and your ability to cope with stress. If you suffer from depression or seasonal affective disorder (SAD), certain dietary changes can help you get well when combined with a treatment program outlined by your health care provider.

Talk to Your Health Care Provider
Be open and honest when discussing your symptoms and feelings. Because depression can have many underlying causes, your doctor should perform a complete physical and also check the following:

  • Thyroid. The thyroid gland controls yours metabolism but indirectly affects your mood. An overactive thyroid can make you feel anxious and irritable, while an under-active thyroid can cause sluggishness, exhaustion, loss of appetite, weight gain, and hair loss.
  • Iron levels. Low iron stores can alter your mood, cause fatigue and difficulty concentrating, and decrease mental alertness.
  • Use of oral contraceptives. Birth control pills can also shift hormone levels and alter mood swings, depression, and fatigue.
  • Sleeping habits. Changes in your sleeping patterns and the quality of your sleep can be closely related to your mood. A lack of sleep can cause many symptoms similar to those of depression.

If your doctor diagnoses you with clinical depression, work with her to develop a treatment plan that suits your lifestyle and discuss what role nutrition might play, especially if you receive prescription medications. The following guidelines are not cures for depression, but they are things to consider along with your treatment program.

DO structure your meals. Eat at approximately the same times each day and don’t skip meals. Enjoy three well-balanced meals and plan snacks between meals. This will help insure that your body is getting the right nutrients throughout the course of the day.

DO eat quality nutrients. Dieting itself is a stress on the body. Individuals who are trying to lose weight and have a history of depression must work to eat foods that are good for the body and the brain. Try incorporating more whole foods, fruits and veggies, and healthy fats by starting with this list of super foods.

Faster than a speeding bullet…
More powerful than a locomotive…
Nutrient-packed with health enhancing properties…

Here come the SUPER FOODS!

These foods benefit your body in so many ways. They power your brain, and correctly and efficiently fuel your body. Super foods fight infection, enhance your immune system, and protect against diseases such as osteoporosis, heart disease, certain cancers, diabetes, and respiratory infections.

While this list of super foods may be longer than most, it shows that great things do come in small packages. These foods are not only healthy, but they’re also affordable, familiar, and readily available at regular grocery stores and farmers markets. With so many choices, you’ll discover just how easy it is to eat super healthy every day…even when on a tight budget.

This is an all-inclusive list, but some foods might not be right for your tastes, preferences or health goals. Remember that no single food can provide everything you need to be healthy. That’s why it’s important to choose a variety of super foods from each category to meet your daily nutrition needs.

Vegetables

Asparagus
Avocados
Beets
Bell peppers
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Collard greens
Crimini mushrooms
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Garlic
Green beans
Kale
Mustard greens
Onions
Peas
Portobello mushrooms
Potatoes
Rainbow chard
Romaine lettuce
Shiitake mushrooms
Spinach
Summer squash
Sweet potatoes
Swiss chard
Tomatoes
Turnip greens
Winter squash
Yams

Calcium-Rich Foods

Almond milk
Cheese, low fat
Cottage cheese, low fat
Milk, skim or 1%
Orange juice with calcium
Rice milk
Soy milk
Yogurt with active cultures, low fat

Fruits

Apples
Apricots
Bananas
Black olives
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cantaloupe
Cherries
Cranberries
Figs
Grapefruit
Grapes
Honeydew melon
Kiwifruit
Lemons
Limes
Nectarines
Oranges
Papaya
Peaches
Pears
Pineapple
Plums
Prunes
Raisins
Raspberries
Strawberries
Watermelon

Grains

Amaranth
Arborio rice
Barley
Brown rice
Buckwheat
Bulgur
Corn
Jasmine rice
Millet
Oats
Quinoa
Rye
Spelt
Triticale
Wheat berries
Whole grain breads, cereal, pasta
Whole wheat breads, cereal, pasta
Wild Rice

Proteins

Almonds
Beef, lean
Black beans
Cashews
Chicken, skinless
Chickpeas
Egg whites
Eggs
Fish, unbreaded
Flaxseed
Garbanzo beans
Hemp seeds
Hummus
Kidney beans
Lima beans
Lentils
Miso
Navy beans
Nuts
Peanut butter, natural
Peanuts
Pinto beans
Pork, lean
Pumpkin seeds
Salmon, canned or fresh
Seafood, unbreaded
Sesame seeds
Soybeans
Sunflower seeds
Tahini
Tempeh
Tofu
Tuna, canned or fresh
Turkey, skinless
Veggie burgers
Walnuts
Wild game, skinless

Miscellaneous

Canola oil
Dark chocolate
Green tea
Olive oil

 

 

DO eat plenty of calories, even if you are trying to lose weight. Extremely low-calorie diets alter your metabolism and increase your risk of malnutrition. Eating less than 1,000 calories per day reduces the amount of tryptophan (an essential amino acid that is needed to produce serotonin) in your body. As a result, serotonin levels drop, which increases symptoms of depression and its chances of recurring. If you have trouble meeting your calorie needs, read Calorie-Boosting Tips.

DO consume plenty of Omega-3s. While some studies have failed to show a connection between omega-3 fatty acid intake and depression symptoms, others suggest that consuming more of these heart-healthy fats may help with depression-especially when taken along with conventional antidepressants. Epidemiological research also shows that populations who eat more fish have lower rates of depression. Foods rich in omega-3s include cold-water fish (salmon, sardines, and mackerel), soybeans, walnuts, eggs fortified with omega-3s, and ground flaxseed.

DO cut back on caffeine. Caffeine acts as a stimulant, making you feel anxious and interfering with sleep patterns. Consume no more than 200- 300 milligrams of caffeine daily.

DO avoid alcohol and drugs. Alcohol and illicit drugs can interact with antidepressant medications and other over-the-counter medications. For many, depression and substance abuse are already closely connected. If you think you have a problem, seek help. Addictive or abusive behaviors can prevent you from a full recovery.

DO eat plenty of “good” carbohydrates, which increase the amount of serotonin in the brain. High serotonin levels can improve mood and decrease symptoms of depression. At minimum, aim for at least 130 grams of carbohydrates each day. And try to forgo the processed, “white” carbs (white rice, white bread, white flour, etc.) in favor of less processed foods like whole grains (brown rice, whole wheat bread and whole grain cereals), fruits and veggies.

Losing Weight While Dealing with Depression
If you are trying to balance weight loss with depression treatment, the following tips will help you do it safely without making your condition worse:

  • Inform your health care provider before beginning a diet for weight loss.
  • With your doctor’s approval, proceed with a slow-pacedweight loss plan, aiming to lose no more than 0.5 pounds each week.
  • Follow a balanced diet that meets all of your nutritional needs for protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals. A registered dietitian in your area can provide an individualized plan to meet your nutritional needs based on your medical history and treatment therapy.
  • Carefully evaluate your mood changes while dieting and seek immediate treatment if you notice any changes.

Depression is difficult for anyone who lives with it. It can sap your motivation to care for yourself, eat well, and exercise—the very things that can help you feel better. While dietary changes alone aren’t a surefire way to prevent or treat depression, they can help you feel better when combined with the treatment options that your health care provider recommends.

Article created on:  2/21/2007

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