Posted by: faithful | August 4, 2007

ages and stages: first through fifth grade

Ages and Stages: First Grade

Brought to you by the American School Counselor Association

Is your six-year-old normal? What’s normal, anyway? Below are some general development milestones to help you understand your child’s progress over the school year. Keep in mind that every child is different and may not fit perfectly into this framework.

Where They Are 

The average six-year old is extremely egocentric and wants to be the center of attention. She:

  • Wants to be the “best” and “first.”
  • Has boundless energy.
  • May be oppositional, silly, brash, and critical.
  • Cries easily; shows a variety of tension-releasing behavior.
  • Is attached to the teacher.
  • Has difficulty being flexible.
  • Often considers fantasy real.

Where They’re Going?

School isn’t just about academics. Your child’s teachers are also helping him grow socially. At six-years-old, your child is learning to understand himself. You can help by encouraging him as he:

  • Develops a positive, realistic self-concept.
  • Learns to respect himself.
  • Begins to understand his own uniqueness.
  • Gains awareness of his feelings.
  • Learns to express feelings.
  • Learns how to participate in groups.
  • Begins to learn from his mistakes.

Ages and Stages: Second Grade

Where They Are

At seven, kids begin to calm down a bit. They:

  • Begin to reason and concentrate.
  • Worry, are self-critical, and may express a lack of confidence.
  • Demand more of their teacher’s time.
  • Dislike being singled out, even for praise.

Where They’re Going

School isn’t just academics. Your child’s teachers are also helping her grow socially. At seven-years-old, your child is continuing to learn about herself and others. You can help by encouraging her as she:

  • Develops a concept of herself.
  • Begins to understand others.
  • Gains respect for others.
  • Builds relationships with others.
  • Develops a sense of responsibility.

Ages and Stages: Third Grade

Where They Are

The average eight-year-old is explosive, excitable, dramatic, and inquisitive. She:

  • Possesses a “know-it-all” attitude.
  • Is able to assume some responsibility for her actions.
  • Actively seeks praise.
  • May undertake more than she can handle successfully.
  • Is self-critical.
  • Recognizes the needs of others.

Where They’re Going 

School isn’t just academics. Your child’s teachers are also helping him grow socially. At eight-years-old, your child is learning how to set goals and understand the consequences of his behavior. You can help by encouraging him as he:

  • Explores the relationship of feelings, goals, and behavior.
  • Learns about choices and consequences.
  • Begins setting goals.
  • Becomes more responsible.
  • Learns how to work with others.

Ages and Stages: Fourth Grade  

Where They Are

Nine is a time of general confusion for kids. Nine-year-olds:

  • Want to put some distance between themselves and adults, and may rebel against authority.
  • Need to be part of a group.
  • Seek independence.
  • Possess a high activity level.
  • Can express a wide range of emotions and verbalize easily.
  • Can empathize.
  • Can think independently and critically, but are tied to peer standards.
  • Begin to increase their sense of truthfulness.
  • Are typically not self-confident.

Where They’re Going

School isn’t just academics. Your child’s teachers are also helping her grow socially. At nine-years-old, your child is learning how to make decisions and set standards. You can help by encouraging your child as she:

  • Begins making decisions.
  • Gains a greater sense of responsibility.
  • Sets personal standards.
  • Develops personal interests and abilities.
  • Develops social skills.
  • Learns to engage in group decision-making.

Ages and Stages: Fifth Grade

Where They Are

The average ten-year-old has a positive approach to life. She:

  • Tends to be obedient, good natured, and fun.
  • Possesses a surprising scope of interests.
  • Finds TV very important and identifies with TV characters.
  • Is capable of increasing independence.
  • Is becoming more truthful and dependable.
  • Tends to be improving her self-concept and acceptance of others.
  • Forms good personal relationships with teachers and counselors.

Where They’re Going

School isn’t just academics. Your child’s teachers are also helping him grow socially. At ten-years-old, your child is developing communication skills and becoming more mature. You can help by encouraging him as he:

  • Improves his listen and responding skills.
  • Increases his problem-solving abilities.
  • Begins to undergo maturational changes.
  • Gains awareness of peer and adult expectations.

If you’re concerned about your child’s behavior, see our experts for help.

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