Posted by: faithful | May 1, 2016

fast food alarm

 

Researchers have found a ‘striking’ new side effect from eating fast food
By Roberto A. Ferdman April 15

The fries are not all right. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, file)
This story and its headline have been been updated, with “alarming” being changed to “striking.”:

“We’re not trying to create paranoia or anxiety, but I do think our findings are alarming,” said one of the study’s authors, Ami Zota, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health at George Washington University. “It’s not every day that you conduct a study where the results are this strong.”

(Update: A few hours after publication, Zota called to say that in reading her quote she felt that the word “alarming” was too strong a word to use to describe her findings. Rather, she said “striking” was more appropriate, because it conveys the magnitude of the findings without assigning a sense of urgency.)

Critics of the fast-food industry have long warned about the perils of our addiction to processed food. Big Macs and Whoppers might taste good, but put too many of them in your body and it will expand as Violet Beauregard’s did in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (although maybe not quite as fast). The evidence is decades in the making. The rise of processed food, after all, has coincided with an alarming growth in the size of our collective gut.

But there might be some new powerful ammunition for those who could do without the food the fast-food industry serves.

Researchers at George Washington University have linked fast-food consumption to the presence of potentially harmful chemicals, a connection they argue could have “great public health significance.” Specifically, the team found that people who eat fast food tend to have significantly higher levels of certain phthalates, which are commonly used in consumer products such as soap and makeup to make them less brittle but have been linked to a number of adverse health outcomes, including higher rates of infertility, especially among males.

The danger, the researchers believe, isn’t necessarily a result of the food itself, but rather the process by which the food is prepared. The findings were published in Environmental Health Perspectives, a journal funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Eat butter every day and other government dietary advice we no longer follow Embed
Share Play Video1:47
The United States government once considered butter and margarine as one of seven food groups to consume daily. Look back at other advice that, sadly, is no longer a part of the USDA’s dietary guidelines. (Jayne W. Orenstein/The Washington Post)

 
Fast-food nation

In order to gauge how fast food affects the presence of certain non-natural chemicals, the team analyzed data for nearly 9,000 people. The data was collected as part of federal nutrition surveys conducted between 2003 and 2010. The surveys included detailed information about the participants’ diets, including what each had eaten in the last 24 hours. They also contained the results of urine samples taken at the same time, which allowed the researchers to measure the levels of three separate chemicals.

For the purpose of the study, any food eaten at or from restaurants without waiters or waitresses was considered fast food. Everything else — food eaten at sit-down restaurants and bars or purchased from supermarkets and vending machines — was not.

The first thing the researchers found was that roughly one-third of the participants said they had eaten some form of fast food over the course of the day leading up to the urine sample collection. That proportion, high as it might seem, is actually in line with government estimates. In fact, more than a third of all children and adolescents living in the country still eat some form of fast food on any given day, a number that hasn’t budged in decades, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The second thing the researchers found is that those participants who said they had eaten fast food in the last 24 hours tended to have much higher levels of two separate phthalates — DEHP and DiNP. People who reported eating only a little fast food had DEHP levels that were 15.5 percent higher and DiNP levels that were 25 percent higher than those who said they had eaten none. For people who reported eating a sizable amount, the increase was 24 percent and 39 percent, respectively.

And the connection held true even after the researchers adjusted for various factors about the participants’ habits and backgrounds that might have contributed to the association between fast-food consumption and phthalate levels.

“We looked at it in so many different ways, and the effect still remains,” said Zota.
The problem with these chemicals
There is little consensus on the harms of phthalates, which are widely used in commerce and give materials such as food packaging added flexibility, except that exposure to them “is widespread.” But there is growing concern that the chemicals could pose a variety of risks, particularly when observed in the sort of levels seen in the study.

“There’s a vast amount of scientific evidence suggesting certain phthalates can contribute to several adverse health effects,” said Zota.

A 2012 study found a strong association between the presence of DEHP and diabetes. A 2013 study found that exposure to the industrial chemical can increase the risk of various allergic diseases in children. And a 2016 study concluded that it can also negatively affect child behavior.

While there is less evidence that DiNP is problematic, some recent research suggests it very well could be. A study undertaken last year, for instance, found that exposure to the phthalate was associated with higher blood pressure.

For these reasons, many governments have moved to limit exposure to the industrial chemicals. Japan disallowed the use of vinyl gloves in food preparation for fear that their use was compromising health. The European Union, which limits the use of the chemical, has been nudging manufacturers to replace it. And the United States restricted its use in toys. In fact, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services warned that DEHP is “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.”

To fear or not to fear
The reason people who eat fast food seem to have much higher levels of potentially harmful industrial chemicals is unclear. But it’s easy enough to guess: the sheer amount of processing that goes into food served at quick-service restaurants.

The more machinery, plastic, conveyor belts, and various forms of processing equipment that food touches, the more likely the food is to contain higher levels of phthalates. And fast food tends to touch a good deal more of these things than, say, the food one purchases at a local farmers market.
[What you need to know about trans fats]

“I really hope this study helps raise public awareness about the exposure problems associated with our industrialized food system,” said Zota.

Considering the prevalence of packaged food — and widespread exposure to phthalates (they can be detected in more than 98 percent of the population, per the CDC) — however, the takeaway isn’t necessarily that fast food is toxic. Fast food, after all, isn’t the only culprit here. Nor are less healthful things in general.

“It’s not fair to say, ‘Oh, these exposures only happen if you eat unhealthy foods,'” Leo Trasande, an associate professor of pediatrics, environmental medicine and population health at New York University, told Bloomberg.

Anything that’s gone through some form of processing or industrial packaging is vulnerable.

Still, given the new study’s findings, it certainly seems as though eating fast food is more toxic than avoiding it, and not for the obvious reasons. Perhaps that’s something many would have expected to hear, but it doesn’t make it any less true.

“Traditional fast food was never meant to be daily fare, and it shouldn’t be,” said Marion Nestle, who is the Paulette Goddard professor of nutrition and food Studies at New York University. “It’s too high in calories and salt and, as we now know, the chemicals that get into our food supply through industrial food production.”

Posted by: faithful | April 13, 2016

complex post traumatic stress disorder

Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD)

 

complex post traumatic

Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD)

Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) is a condition that results from chronic or long-term exposure to emotional trauma over which a victim has little or no control and from which there is little or no hope of escape, such as in cases of:

  • domestic emotional, physical or sexual abuse
  • childhood emotional, physical or sexual abuse
  • entrapment or kidnapping.
  • slavery or enforced labor.
  • long term imprisonment and torture
  • repeated violations of personal boundaries.
  • long-term objectification.
  • exposure to gaslighting & false accusations
  • long-term exposure to inconsistent, push-pull,splitting or alternating raging & hooveringbehaviors.
  • long-term taking care of mentally ill or chronically sick family members.
  • long term exposure to crisis conditions.

When people have been trapped in a situation over which they had little or no control at the beginning, middle or end, they can carry an intense sense of dread even after that situation is removed. This is because they know how bad things can possibly be. And they know that it could possibly happen again. And they know that if it ever does happen again, it might be worse than before.

The degree of C-PTSD trauma cannot be defined purely in terms of the trauma that a person has experienced. It is important to understand that each person is different and has a different tolerance level to trauma. Therefore, what one person may be able to shake off, another person may not. Therefore more or less exposure to trauma does not necessarily make the C-PTSD any more or less severe.

C-PTSD sufferers may “stuff” or suppress their emotional reaction to traumatic events without resolution either because they believe each event by itself doesn’t seem like such a big deal or because they see no satisfactory resolution opportunity available to them. This suppression of “emotional baggage” can continue for a long time either until a “last straw” event occurs, or a safer emotional environment emerges and the damn begins to break.

The “Complex” in Complex Post Traumatic Disorder describes how one layer after another of trauma can interact with one another. Sometimes, it is mistakenly assumed that the most recent traumatic event in a person’s life is the one that brought them to their knees. However, just addressing that single most-recent event may possibly be an invalidating experience for the C-PTSD sufferer. Therefore, it is important to recognize that those who suffer from C-PTSD may be experiencing feelings from all their traumatic exposure, even as they try to address the most recent traumatic event.

This is what differentiates C-PTSD from the classic PTSD diagnosis – which typically describes an emotional response to a single or to a discrete number of traumatic events.

Difference between C-PTSD & PTSD

Although similar, Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) differs slightly from the more commonly understood & diagnosed condition Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in causes and symptoms.

C-PTSD results more from chronic repetitive stress from which there is little chance of escape. PTSD can result from single events, or short term exposure to extreme stress or trauma.

Therefore a soldier returning from intense battle may be likely to show PTSD symptoms, but a kidnapped prisoner of war who was held for several years may show additional symptoms of C-PTSD.

Similarly, a child who witnesses a friend’s death in an accident may exhibit some symptoms of PTSD but a child who grows up in an abusive home may exhibit the additional C-PTSD characteristics shown below:

C-PTSD – What it Feels Like:

People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel un-centered and shaky, as if they are likely to have an embarrassing emotional breakdown or burst into tears at any moment. They may feel unloved – or that nothing they can accomplish is ever going to be “good enough” for others.

People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel compelled to get away from others and be by themselves, so that no-one will witness what may come next. They may feel afraid to form close friendships to prevent possible loss should another catastrophe strike.

People who suffer from C-PTSD may feel that everything is just about to go “out the window” and that they will not be able to handle even the simplest task. They may be too distracted by what is going on at home to focus on being successful at school or in the workplace.

C-PTSD Characteristics

How it can manifest in the victim(s) over time:

Rage turned inward: Eating disorders. Depression. Substance Abuse / Alcoholism. Truancy. Dropping out. Promiscuity. Co-dependence. Doormat syndrome (choosing poor partners, trying to please someone who can never be pleased, trying to resolve the primal relationship)

Rage turned outward: Theft. Destruction of property. Violence. Becoming a control freak.

Other: Learned hyper vigilance. Clouded perception or blinders about others (especially romantic partners) Seeks positions of power and / or control: choosing occupations or recreational outlets which may put oneself in physical danger. Or choosing to become a “fixer” – Therapist, Mediator, etc.

Avoidance – The practice of withdrawing from relationships with other people as a defensive measure to reduce the risk of rejection, accountability, criticism or exposure.

Blaming – The practice of identifying a person or people responsible for creating a problem, rather than identifying ways of dealing with the problem.

Catastrophizing – The habit of automatically assuming a “worst case scenario” and inappropriately characterizing minor or moderate problems or issues as catastrophic events.

“Control-Me” Syndrome – This describes a tendency which some people have to foster relationships with people who have a controlling narcissistic, antisocial or “acting-out” nature.

Denial – Believing or imagining that some painful or traumatic circumstance, event or memory does not exist or did not happen.

Dependency – An inappropriate and chronic reliance by an adult individual on another individual for their health, subsistence, decision making or personal and emotional well-being.

Depression (Non-PD) -Depression is when you feel sadder than your circumstances dictate, for longer than your circumstances last, but still can’t seem to break out of it.

Escape To Fantasy – Taking an imaginary excursion to a happier, more hopeful place.

Fear of Abandonment – An irrational belief that one is imminent danger of being personally rejected, discarded or replaced.

Relationship Hyper Vigilance – Maintaining an unhealthy level of interest in the behaviors, comments, thoughts and interests of others.

Identity Disturbance – A psychological term used to describe a distorted or inconsistent self-view

Learned Helplessness- Learned helplessness is when a person begins to believe that they have no control over a situation, even when they do.

Low Self-Esteem – A common name for a negatively-distorted self-view which is inconsistent with reality.

Panic Attacks – Short intense episodes of fear or anxiety, often accompanied by physical symptoms, such as hyperventilating, shaking, sweating and chills.

Perfectionism – The maladaptive practice of holding oneself or others to an unrealistic, unattainable or unsustainable standard of organization, order, or accomplishment in one particular area of living, while sometimes neglecting common standards of organization, order or accomplishment in other areas of living.

Selective Memory and Selective Amnesia – The use of memory, or a lack of memory, which is selective to the point of reinforcing a bias, belief or desired outcome.

Self-Loathing – An extreme hatred of one’s own self, actions or one’s ethnic or demographic background.

Tunnel Vision – The habit or tendency to only see or focus on a single priority while neglecting or ignoring other important priorities.

C-PTSD Causes

C-PTSD is caused by a prolonged or sustained exposure to emotional trauma or abuse from which no short-term means of escape is available or apparent to the victim.

The precise neurological damage that exists in C-PTSD victims is not well understood.

C-PTSD Treatment

Little has been done in clinical studies of treatment of C-PTSD. However, in general the following is recommended:

  • Removal of and protection from the source of the trauma and/or abuse.
  • Acknowledgement of the trauma as real, important and undeserved.
  • Acknowledge that the trauma came from something that was stronger than the victim and therefore could not be avoided.
  • Acknowledgement of the “complex” nature of C-PTSD – that responses to earlier traumas may have led to decisions that brought on additional, undeserved trauma.
  • Acknowledgement that recovery from the trauma is not trivial and will require significant time and effort.
  • Separation of residual problems into those that the victim can resolve (such as personal improvement goals) and those that the victim cannot resolve (such as the behavior of a disordered family member)
  • Mourning for what has been lost and cannot be recovered.
  • Identification of what has been lost and can be recovered.
  • Program of recovery with focus on what can be improved in an individual’s life that is under their own control.
  • Placement in a supportive environment where the victim can discover they are not alone and can receive validation for their successes and support through their struggles.
  • As necessary, personal therapy to promote self-discovery.
  • As required, prescription of antidepressant medications.

What to do about C-PTSD if you’ve got it:

Remove yourself from the primary or situation or secondary situations stemming from the primary abuse. Seek therapy. Talk about it. Write about it. Meditation. Medication if needed. Physical Exercise. Rewrite the script of your life.

What not to do about it:

  • Stay. Hold it in. Bottle it up. Act out. Isolate. Self-abuse. Perpetuate the cycle.
  • What to do about it if you know somebody else who has C-PTSD:
  • Offer sympathy, support, a shoulder to cry on, lend an ear. Speak from experience. Assist with practical resolution when appropriate (guidance towards escape, therapy, etc.) Be patient.
  • What not to do about it if you know somebody else who has it:
  • Do not push your own agenda: proselytize, moralize, speak in absolutes, tell them to “get over it”, or try to force reconciliation with the perpetrator or offer “sure fire” cures.

C-PTSD Support Groups & Links:

Posted by: faithful | April 2, 2016

polyvagal nerve (from youtube)

 

 

Posted by: faithful | April 2, 2016

brain based therapy

John Arden on Brain-Based Therapy

by Rebecca Aponte

The outspoken author of Brain-Based Therapy discusses the value of integrating therapeutic approaches, including neuropsychology, nutrition, exercise, CBT, motivational interviewing, and the therapeutic alliance.

RA: Let’s walk through a hypothetical. I come to see you because I feel depressed and generally anxious, and this has been going on for some months now. Where would you start to look for the cause of my feelings and some relief?

JA: It’s interesting that you say depressed and anxious, because under Pax Medica, if you were depressed and anxious together we would have two diagnoses on Axis I—a comorbid problem. Well, you’re one person. Are these two genetic disorders you have? What a silly idea. And the prescribed pharmacological agents actually work against one another. These stupid benzos, which are really a nuisance in the mental health world, would actually contribute not only to addiction, tolerance, and withdrawal problems, but also to depression. And then you’d toss in an SSRI or something like that, so you’d have this weird cocktail.

There is an interesting neurochemistry that occurs with anxiety and depression. For example, for 90 minutes after you experience a severe stressful incident, your levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin will be down. Let’s say that you’ve just found out that you can’t get into school. All the PhD programs have turned you down. That’s a pretty big blow, right?

So you’re going to get a downregulation of all those neurotransmitter systems, and you’re going to withdraw a little bit. But it’s what you do with that neurochemistry and those neurodynamics that can tumble you into more anxiety and more depression, or get you out of it. If you do things that kindle up the same systems that would get you more anxious and depressed, you’ll get more anxious and depressed.

Now, we’re going to have bumps in the road. It’s what you do in response—it’s that resiliency. Some of the positive psychology spinoffs are paying attention to that, and of course the counseling psychologists have long done that.

RA: So, if I were your client, would you want me to tell you about something stressful that happened and what I did afterwards?

JA: I often do that, just to get an idea of how people react to certain events in their lives—to get a characteristic description. I’m also paying attention to the way they describe them to me, because that interaction between us is so important. It replicates other relationships they’re having that might have great continuity with the earlier attachment-based relationships. It tells me a lot about how I can intervene, because I don’t want to create more resistance. I do like Milton Erickson a lot—that indirect approach. I’m not going to want to shut you down and have you screen me off, but rather do somemotivational interviewing to some degree—which is very Rogerian, in fact. Bill Miller was a Rogerian from the school that I came from.

RA: Out of curiosity, did you study with him at UNM?

JA: No, I didn’t. In fact, I didn’t know about him until after I left. I don’t know if he was there then—that was 30 years ago. But had he been there and I missed him, I would have been disappointed, because I really like his contribution to the substance abuse community.

RA: And substance abuse is one thing that we haven’t really touched much on in terms of what neuroscience is really teaching us. There’s big debate about whether addiction is a genetic disorder.

JA: There is some literature to suggest that if you have two alcoholic parents, your vulnerability to become an alcoholic is heightened. But let’s say the concordance rate is 50 percent. Well, what about the other 50 percent? It isn’t a one-and-one factor.

In a discussion I had with Fred Blume, one of the pushers of the alcohol gene concept, I asked, “How about an acquired disease? You guys are really into this disease concept.” AA’s really into it. AA and NA are the most powerful self-help groups in the world, in my opinion. My sister-in-law’s life was saved as a result. Fantastic groups. I love their little jingles and all that. But they’re too into this disease concept. It’s useful in early recovery, but you could create a disease. It’s bidirectional. The more I drink alcohol, the more I feel like I need alcohol, because my biology changes. I downregulate various neurotransmitter systems, so now I feel like I need to mellow out because now I’m downregulating the synthesis of GABA. That means I need more GABA-like effect because I’m always dampening down glutamate.

What I think therapists ought to be paying attention to is how these various substance abuse habits, if you want to call it that, create psychological symptomatology. [quote:I see all sorts of people here in the North Bay who are suffering from anxiety and/or depression, and I find out they’re just drinking a glass or two of wine at night.

RA: That’s a lot of wine, though.

JA: I think it’s a lot of wine. I drink a glass every week or two. It would be nice if you could have two glasses of wine a night, but my sleep gets all messed up. You get the mid-sleep-cycle awakening and all that. And that’s a small snapshot. What about the next week? These are subtle effects, but when I used to do neuropsychological testing and psychological testing, and then later teach it, we used to say, “Don’t test a wet brain for up to three months after your last drink.” There are all sorts of artifacts to subtle alcohol consumption.

And red wine isn’t that cool, you know. It’s the resveratrol in the skin of the red grape. You can drink Welch’s grape juice and still get the same effect. You don’t need the alcohol.

RA: And what about other drugs? I haven’t heard too many therapists saying that they necessarily ask their clients, “Do you smoke pot?”

JA: Everybody here does. And pot is one that I really pay close attention to in the North Bay, because of all these people on medical marijuana cards. They have a sore back. Well, give me a break. So do I, but I don’t smoke marijuana now. I did 40 some years ago as a young hipster, but I’m glad I stopped 40 years ago, because otherwise I’d be muddled and kind of down. THC is chemically structured like a neuromodulator called anandamide, which is Sanskrit for “bliss.” It orchestrates the activity of a number of neurotransmitters, so when you’re stoned you get what we call virtual novelty. “Look at this cup! God, that is so incredible. Look at the way it’s shaped, and the colors! This is amazing.” Then the next day you get what we would call in the ’60s “jelly brain,” because everything’s downregulated now. And you never get the same high.

So now what we see are all these people smoking medical marijuana who have low-grade depression. They can’t remember much, because they downregulate the acetylcholine release in their hippocampus and have symptoms very much like ADD. God, I get people with ADD evals all the time who are smoking marijuana.

So with regard to substance abuse, psychotherapists should perform a full analysis of everything the clients are doing, instead of saying such things as, “Do you abuse alcohol?” I want to know what they’re consuming rather than ask blanket questions.

RA: Well, what’s abuse? “Yeah, I have five beers a night, but I’m fine.”

JA: Exactly. But if somebody’s drinking two, I’m concerned about that, especially if she’s anxious or depressed. Or if somebody’s taking a toke of marijuana a night, and he’s coming in with this low-grade depression, muddled thinking, and attentional problems, I’m concerned about that.

Defining Therapeutic Success

RA: In the way that you’re visualizing therapy, how do you define therapeutic success?

JA: We’re always a little too symptom focused. I still think we ought to be paying attention to symptoms—that’s an important part of the picture—but we also ought to pay attention to what clients are telling us about their overall improvement and their perspective in life: “I’m feeling so much more hopeful and so much more resilient and I’m not as easily stressed.” And we’re getting more of that from the outcome management process, instead of, “You originally came in with these panic symptoms. How’s the panic doing?” “Oh, I don’t have those panic symptoms anymore.” Well, that’s good. That’s only part of the picture, though. There’s got to be a larger look at things: is the relationship improved, for instance?

 

Brain-Based Therapy and Practical Neuroscience: Attachment & Emotion Regulation
John Arden, Ph.D

You change the brain by getting out of your comfort zone. You don’t want to stay in a state of low-stress, boredom or depression -nor be in a state of high stress or anxiety. You should strive for a level of optimum stress. 

Be on the look out for periods of flux or readiness for change. Work with the person wherever they are and as early as possible.

Relationship-there was a study done that concluded that the therapist’s relationship with the client was more important to the client’s functioning than the relationship between the medication and the client.

Harm can be done when the therapist makes the therapy process too comfortable for the client. Again, you need to be pushed out of your comfort zone to grow. “Safe Emergency.” Sometimes you need to risk the relationship to gain a relationship.

30% of waking hours are spent daydreaming or ruminating. This is when you use your Default Mode Network. 

If you avoid what makes you anxious, you will become more anxious over time.  If you do what you feel like doing, you will get worse. You’ve got to get out of your comfort zone.

Worries are possibilities not probabilities.

The Pre-Frontal Cortex

Picture

The PFC is the control center of the brain.
It is the last part of the brain to myelinate. This explains some teenage behavior. 

Are teenage brains really different from adult brains?

Left Frontal Lobe

Positive emotions

Approach Behaviors

Label thoughts and feelings

Develop new narratives to alleviate anxiety and stress

Right Frontal Lobe

Negative emotions

Withdrawal behaviors

Feeling overwhelmed

Neurogenesis

Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem cells and progenitor cells. Most active during pre-natal development, neurogenesis is responsible for populating the growing brain with neurons.
Stress (and other factors) can decrease neurogenesis.
Exercise can increase neurogenesis.

What Brain Insights Can Boost Your Student’s Classroom Success?

Mirror Neurons

You see a stranger stub her toe and you immediately flinch in sympathy, or you notice a friend wrinkle up his face in disgust while tasting some food and suddenly your own stomach recoils at the thought of eating. This ability to instinctively and immediately understand what other people are experiencing has long baffled neuroscientists, but recent research now suggests a fascinating explanation: brain cells called mirror neurons.
Those with ASD see and read faces as though they were objects therefore they do not read emotions they way that those not on the spectrum do.

Posted by: faithful | March 19, 2016

psychopaths in the family law system

psychopaths

 

The Tactics and Ploys of Psychopath Aggressors in the Family Law System
March 1, 2011

In the twenty years I have been advising parents, children, and their legal advisers in several hundred cases in Family Law matters, I have often been asked, “Why is it that children are so often ordered to have contact with, and even into the custody of, parents who have abused them and have perpetrated violence against their partners.”

The answer to this question is not simple and involves an examination of the requirements of Family Laws which stress the importance of children having both parents in their lives after parental separation, the dynamics of legal processes, and the often very clear gender biases of the principals involved in judicial processes.

But one of the most outstanding and consistent features of proceedings involving the care of children post-separation are the conduct and behaviours which can be identified as clearly fitting the definitions of psychopathy/sociopathy.

The major personality traits of the psychopath are supremacy and narcissism. The afflicted individual must be in complete control of their environment and all persons who are a part of that environment or can serve the psychopath’s purposes in maintaining control.

The psychopath is capable of using both aggressive anger and passive anger with cunning and guile, to achieve their goals of exerting control. Examples of such contrary behaviours are the aggressive violence against intimate partners, with the frequent inherent abuse of children, designed to groom friends, relatives, and professionals into believing they are harmless and indeed very stable and friendly. If thwarted in attaining these goals, however, the passive can quickly turn into the aggressive.

In furtherance of these traits, the major tactics and ploys of the psychopath are:

–denial of wrongdoings in the face of clear evidence;
–refusal to take responsibility for behaviours and actions;
–minimisation of the incident and consequences;
–blame being placed on others;
–misrepresentation, fabrication, embellishment and distortion of information and evidence;
–minimisation of all information and evidence regarding wrongdoing;
–claims of victim status, alleging the victim was the aggressor;
–projection of their own actions and behaviour onto the victim; e.g. she abuses/neglects the children/ she is an alcoholic or drug abuser. This is based on the belief by the psychopath that attack is the best form of defence.
–The grooming of friends, relatives, and professionals is very clear in many cases, and in particular some psychiatrists, psychologists and family evaluators/reporters have been hoodwinked by such tactics and ploys by the psychopathic individual. Their reports, of course favouring the psychopath, have very considerable influence on the Courts and their determinations.

Very often clear evidence of intimate partner violence such as convictions, Domestic Violence Orders, Apprehended Violence Orders and Restraining Orders against the psychopathic aggressor and medical evidence of injuries suffered by the adult and child victims are ignored or dismissed as irrelevant by such professionals.

Such professionals now refer to such cases as `high conflict’ cases, when it is clear that they are situations of a violent aggressor/tormentor/persecutor and their victims. It is easy to see how the cases in Austria and America where young girls were imprisoned for many years by controlling individuals and regularly abused in several ways were undetected, when the aggressors/persecutors/tormentors were able to convince their family members, relatives and associates that they were reasonable, normal people. The same often occurs in other cases of violence and murder where neighbours report that the accused murderer is a nice and friendly neighbour. They do not recognise the Jekyll and Hyde aspects of the psychopath’s ploys and tactics and of those they have effectively groomed in their beliefs.

The high conflict which usually occurs in such cases is most commonly engendered by the respective lawyers, conditioned by operating in an adversarial process and arena, whose own major goal is to ‘win’, whatever may be the justness and fairness of the result.

It is not difficult to see, therefore, how the psychopath is able to readily gain the sympathy and support of some of the professionals engaged in the Family Law system and for them to abandon and forfeit their professional objectivity and impartiality in such circumstances. In blaming others the psychopath will allege the former partner is mentally ill and in some cases the former partner may be suffering a Complex Post Traumatic Disorder after suffering years of physical, mental, and sexual abuse and violence. This is often misinterpreted and misdiagnosed as a Borderline Personality Disorder or similar psychiatric term. In effect it is a classic ‘blame the victim’ scenario.

The groomed professionals then enable the psychopath to achieve their primary objective, which is to maintain power and control over their victims, their former partner and children. It is an act of vengeance and spite but mostly it is to maintain the power and control and feelings of supremacism and narcissism. “I am faultless and flawless and in control of my whole environment” are the unvoiced cravings of the psychopath, and “I can continue to inflict my tortures on my victims with impunity” are the psychopath’s continuing behaviours.

The Family Law and their shared parenting provisions and its administration by the Family Courts have become ready enablers for the psychopath.

Posted by: faithful | March 12, 2016

biology of depression

Posted by: faithful | March 10, 2016

coconut oil

THEY SAID COCONUT OIL WAS GREAT FOR YOU, BUT THIS IS WHAT THEY DIDN’T TELL YOU

  • coconut oil
  • coconut butter
  • coconut shreds
  • coconut water
  • coconut milk and cream
  • coconut flour
  • and even coconut soya sauce (try it, it’s actually delicious)

Coconut (C. nucifera) belongs to the Arecaceae (Palmae) family and the subfamily Cocoideae.

The flesh of the coconut is very high in healthy fatty acids. The composition of fat varies depending on the type and processing of the oil. Medium-chain saturated fatty acids make up approximately 90% of coconut oil with a slight contribution of mono-unsaturated fatty acids and poly-unsaturated fatty acids.

What’s so good about Medium Chain Fatty Acids?

Medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFA’s) are easily digested, absorbed, and utilized by the body, while freely crossing the blood-brain barrier in the unbound form, which means it can be used by the brain as an energy source but also for neurological health.

What’s also great is that virgin (unrefined) coconut oil is affordable, readily available, delicious and completely natural. It’s also…

  • Anti-carcinogenic (prevents the spread of cancer cells and enhances the immune system)
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-microbial/ Infection fighting (bacteria, viruses, yeast, fungi, parasites and protozoa)
  • An antioxidant (protects against free-radical formation and damage)
  • Improves nutrient absorption (easily digestible; makes fat-based vitamins more available to the body – ie. vitamin A, D, E, K)
  • Nontoxic to humans and animals

Coconut Oil for Personal Hygiene and the Body

  1.   Age Spots (also known as liver spots) – applying coconut oil directly to the age spot will help it fade.
  2.   After Shave – coconut oil will help heal your skin after shaving without clogging pores. Great for razor burn!
  3.   Baldness – combine coconut oil with lavender, rosemary, thyme, cedarwood, Jojoba oil, Grapeseed/ castor oil and a little cayenne pepper. Apply three times a day (or before bed) to affected area of hair loss and massage in. Coconut oil and these essential oils supports cell regeneration.
  4.   Body Scrub – mix coconut oil and salt together and rub all over! Rinse off and your skin will be super soft. You can add in essential oils if you would like a specific smell.
  5.   Bruises – applied directly to the bruise, coconut oil enhances the healing process by reducing swelling and redness.
  6.   Bug Bites – when applied directly to a bug bite, coconut oil can stop the itching and burning sensation as well as hasten the healing process.
  7.   Burns – apply to burn site immediately and continue applying until healed. Will reduce the chances of permanent scarring and promotes healing.
  8.  Chapstick – just rub a little into lips and it not only acts as a softening agent but it also has an SPF of about 4 so you get a little protection!
  9. Cradle Cap – having issues with dry skin on your baby’s scalp? Coconut oil will not only nourish your baby’s skin, it also helps eliminate cradle cap. Just rub a teaspoon onto scalp daily.
  10. Dandruff – coconut oil soaks into the scalp moisturizing dry skin and relieves symptoms of dandruff. It also helps to control oil secretion from the scalp, another leading cause of dandruff.
  11. Deodorant – coconut oil alone can be used as a deodorant, but even more effective in combination with cornstarch/arrowroot powder and baking soda.
  12. Diaper Salve – very comforting on a rashy bum with no harsh chemicals. Also safe for cloth diapers.
  13. Eye cream – apply under the eyes to reduce puffiness, bags and wrinkles. Use on the lids in the evening.
  14. Face Wash/ Soap – mix equal parts coconut oil with olive oil, almond oil, avocado oil and castor oil and use in place of soap when washing your face. Wet face, rub oil in and leave on for two minutes, rinse and pat dry. One teaspoon should be adequate.
  15. Hair conditioner/ Deep Treatment – use as a leave-in hair conditioner by applying a teaspoon of coconut oil to your ends and then running your fingers through your hair to distribute the rest. For a deeper treatment, rub in a tablespoon of coconut oil onto your dry scalp and gently work through to the ends. Put a shower cap on to prevent transfer onto bed linens and leave on overnight.
  16. Hair Gel/ Defrizzer – rub a little between your palms and either scrunch into hair (for curly hair) or finger comb in through from scalp to ends (for wavy/straight hair).
  17. Healing – when applied on scrapes and cuts, coconut oil forms a thin, chemical layer which protects the wound from outside dust, bacteria and virus. Coconut oil speeds up the healing process of bruises by repairing damaged tissues. Plus, it smells a heck-of-a-lot better than anything from the pharmacy.
  18. Lubricant – it is an all-natural, perfectly safe personal lubricant for masturbation and sex. Not compatible with latex!
  19. Makeup Remover – use a cotton swab and a dab of coconut oil and you would be amazed at how well it works!
  20. Massage Oil – pretty simple; grab some and rub!
  21. Moisturizer – simply scoop some out of the jar and apply all over your body, including neck and face. Often lotions are water-based and can dry out your skin even more.
  22. Nipple Cream – works great to nourish cracked, sore or dry nipples. Apply to a cotton ball and leave on your nipples between feedings.
  23. Acne Skin Fix – prone to oily skin or an oily T-zone? Use a pea sized amount underneath makeup or alone to reduce oil gland stimulation. Often acne prone skin is actually too dry, which signals your glands to produce more oil and clogs the pores.
  24. Pre-Shave – coconut oil will prep skin for the pending damage caused by shaving.
  25. Skin Conditions – coconut oil can relieves skin problems such as psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.
  26. Stretch Marks – coconut oil is great at nourishing damaged skin. It may not be the magic stretch mark cure but it will help.
  27. Sun Burn Relief – rub liberal amounts of coconut oil into the affected area.
  28. Sunscreen – It’s not high, but coconut oil does have an SPF of around 4.
  29. Swimmers Ear – mix garlic oil and coconut oil and put a few drops in affected ear for about 10 minutes. Do this 2-3 times a day and it usually works within one or two days.
  30. Tattoo Healing and Moisturizer – continued use of coconut oil on tattoos will help keep the pigment from fading. Used on new tattoos, coconut will hasten the healing process and decrease the chance of infection.
  31. Toothpaste – there are numerous recipes out there but I just mix coconut oil and baking soda and dab a little of the mix on my toothbrush.
  32. Wrinkle Prevention and Wrinkle Reducer – rubbing coconut oil on winkles and sagging skin helps strengthen the connective tissues to bring back that youthful look!

Coconut Oil for General Health and Wellness

  1. Breastfeeding – for breastfeeding moms, consuming 3 ½ tablespoons of coconut oil daily will enrich the milk supply.
  2. Bones and Teeth – coconut oil aids in the absorption of calcium and magnesium leading to better development of bones and teeth.
  3. Digestion – the saturated fats in coconut oil help control parasites and fungi that cause indigestion and other digestion related problems such as irritable bowel syndrome. The fat in coconut oil also aids in the absorption of vitamins, minerals and amino acids, making you healthier all around.
  4. Fitness – coconut oil has been proven to stimulate your metabolism, improve thyroid function, and escalate energy levels, all of which help decrease your unwanted fat while increasing muscle.
  5. Insulin Support – Improves insulin secretion and utilization of blood glucose making it great for both diabetics and non-diabetic.
  6. Lung Function – increases the fluidity of cell surfaces.
  7. Nausea – rub some coconut oil on the inside for the wrist (PC 6) and forearm to calm an upset stomach.
  8. Nose bleeds – coconut oil can prevent nose bleeding that is caused by sensitivity to weather such as extreme heat and extreme cold. This condition happens when the nasal passages become dry because of cold or dry air resulting to burns and cracks in the mucus membranes so bleeding happens. To prevent this just put coconut oil in you nostrils. Doing this will strengthen and protect the capillaries in the nasal passages.
  9. Gum Health – oil pulling with coconut oil offers a two for one health benefit!
  10. Stress Relief – relieve mental fatigue by applying coconut oil to the head in a circular, massaging motion. The natural aroma of coconuts is extremely soothing thus helping to lower your stress level.
  11. Vitamin and nutrient absorption – makes fat-based nutrients more available to the body – ie. vitamin A, D, E, K
  12. Weight loss – the saturated fats contribute to weight loss and controlling cravings.
  13. Mental Cognition and Productivity – medium chain triglycerides freely pass the blood-brain barrier and allows an alternate source of energy to improve cognition.

Coconut Oil for Internal Health Problems

– when taken internally it is known for aiding, preventing, and relieving these health issues

  1. Acid Reflux/ Indigestion – if taken after a meal
  2. Adrenal and Chronic Fatigue
  3. Allergies – seasonal hay fever
  4. Alzheimer’s/Dementiaread my research here
  5. Asthma – even in children
  6. Autism
  7. Bowel function – constipation, IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), gut infections
  8. Bronchial Infections and Cystic Fibrosis
  9. Cancer – has been shown to prevent colon and breast cancer
  10. Candida Albicans
  11. Cholesterol – improves HDL (‘good’ cholesterol) to LDL (‘bad’ cholesterol) ratio in people with high cholesterol
  12. Poor Circulation – feeling cold all the time or edema, especially in the extremities, apply coconut oil to the skin in a light circular pattern towards the heart. Similar to dry skin brushing
  13. Colds and Flues – as an anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory agent
  14. Mild Depression and Cognitive Dis-ease – in conjunction with CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), fish oil and other treatment strategies
  15. Diabetes – helps keep blood sugar levels stable and helps with cravings
  16. Epilepsy – known to reduce epileptic seizures
  17. Flaky, Dry Skin – poor oil intake often results in dry skin and dandruff
  18. Gallbladder Disease – dietary oils can help increase bile flow, which can be helpful for gallbladder issues, but possibly harmful (ie. Gallstones)
  19. Gas – foul gas is often due to imbalance in the gut bacteria. Coconut oil is a mild anti-microbial to help re-establish healthy gut flora
  20. H. pylori – oral intake. Occasionally, antibiotic treatment may be necessary.
  21. Heart Disease – protects arteries from injury that causes atherosclerosis
  22. Hemorrhoids – can applied externally or internally twice a day
  23. Hot Flashes
  24. Immune System Builder
  25. Irritable Bowel Syndrome – alternating diarrhea and constipation are key signs of IBS
  26. Jaundice
  27. Kidney Disease and Stones – aids in dissolving small stones
  28. Liver Disease
  29. Lung Disease
  30. Malnutrition
  31. Mental Clarity
  32. Menstruation Relief – regarding pain/cramps and heavy blood flow
  33. Migraines – with regular use
  34. Pancreatitis
  35. Periodontal Disease and Tooth Decay
  36. Prostate Enlargement – BPH, benign prostatic hyperplasia
  37. Stomach Ulcers – helps soothe stomach lining and limit H. pylori growth
  38. Thrush
  39. Thyroid Function – can help regulates an overactive or underactive thyroid
  40. Urinary Tract Infections and Bladder Infections

Coconut Oil and Topical Health Problems

– when applied topically it is known for aiding, relieving, or even curing these health issues

  1. Acne – Often acne prone skin is actually too dry, which signals your glands to produce more oil and clogs the pores.
  2. Head Lice – topical application
  3. Allergies/Hay Fever – rub a little inside the nostrils for quick relief. The pollen will cling to the oil.
  4. Athletes Foot
  5. Toenail Fungus
  6. Back Pain and Sore Muscles
  7. Boils and Cysts
  8. Cellulite
  9. Circumcision healing – although I don’t support circumcision, coconut oil may help with healing.
  10. Decongestant – rub coconut oil on the chest and under the nose when congested from a cold or allergies
  11. Ear infection – place a few drops of coconut and garlic oil inside the ear twice daily for relief from pain. Also fights the infection itself.
  12. Genital Warts – genital warts often go away on their own after 2 years of the initial infection. Addition of topical coconut oil application over 6 month may be helpful
  13. Gum Disease, Gingivitis and Canker Sores – use as a toothpaste or rub directly on gums
  14. Herpes – applied topically and taken internally
  15. Hives – reduces the itch and swelling
  16. Pink eye – applied around and in the eye

BONUS: Coconut Oil and Pets/ Animals

Check with your veterinarian but the recommended dosage for animals is 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of body weight twice daily.

  1. Aids healing of digestive disorders – like inflammatory bowel syndrome and colitis
  2. Aids in arthritis or ligament problems
  3. Aids in elimination of hairballs and coughing
  4. Promotes the healing – when applied topically to cuts, wounds, hot spots, dry skin and hair, bites and stings
  5. Clears up skin conditions – such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis, and itchy skin
  6. Disinfects cuts – and promotes wound healing
  7. Great for dogs and cats for general wellness – Just add a teaspoon to their water bowl daily.
  8. Helps prevent or control diabetes
  9. Helps sedentary dogs feel energetic – Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) have been shown to improve brain energy metabolism and decrease the amyloid protein buildup that results in brain lesions in older dogs.
  10. Helps reduce weight – increases energy
  11. Improves digestion and nutrient absorption
  12. Makes coats – coat becomes sleek and glossy, and deodorizes doggy odor
  13. Prevents and treats yeast and fungal infections – including candida
  14. Reduces allergic reactions and improves skin health
  15. Reduces or eliminates bad breath in dogs
  16. Regulates and balance insulin and promotes normal thyroid function

BONUS: Other Uses for Coconut Oil

  1. Chewing Gum in Hair Remover – just rub some coconut oil over the stuck chewing gum, leave in for about 30 minutes, then roll the gum between your fingertip. Voila! It’s out!
  2. Goo Gone – just mix equal parts coconut oil and baking soda into a paste. Apply to the “sticky” area and let it set for a minute. Then scrub off with an old toothbrush or the scrubby side of a sponge.
  3. Insect repellent – mix coconut oil with peppermint oil extract and rub it all over exposed skin. Keeps insects off better than anything with DEET! Tons safer too.
  4. Moisturizing and cleaning leather products
  5. Oiling wood cutting boards and wood bowls
  6. Polishing Bronze – all you have to do is rub a little oil into a cotton towel and then wipe down the statue. It cleans and helps deepen the color of your bronze.
  7. Polish Furniture – coconut oil with a little bit of lemon juice to polish wood furniture. However, I recommend you test it first on a very small, unobtrusive part of your furniture to make sure it works the way you’d like.
  8. Seasoning animal hide drums
  9. Seasoning cookware
  10. Soap making – coconut oil can be used as one of the fats in soap.

Did we miss any? Do you use coconut oil for something not on the list?

Please share this post on your social medial wall and add your favorites with #101CoconutOil #healthyfats @DrAlisonChenND.

I am always excited to find new ways to implement coconut oil!

There’s a reason everyone’s going crazy for coconut oil, give it a try and see the results for yourself! One of Hearty Soul’s favourite lines so far is by NIUCOCO because they only use cold-pressed extra virgin coconut oil, an ingredient I’ve yet to find on any other label. Their products are also free of artificial fragrances and phthalates—they’re entirely chemical-free and they work well. 

Posted by: faithful | February 29, 2016

helping school children who are dealing with trauma

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Sponsored by Starr TLC

10 Things About Childhood Trauma Every Teacher Needs to Know

With grief, sadness is obvious. With trauma, the symptoms can go largely unrecognized because it shows up looking like other problems: frustration, acting out, difficulty concentrating, following directions or working in a group. Often students are misdiagnosed with anxiety, behavior disorders or attention disorders, rather than understanding the trauma that’s driving those symptoms and reactions.

For children who have experienced trauma, learning can be a big struggle. But once trauma is identified as the root of the behavior, we can adapt our approach to help kids cope when they’re at school. Detroit-based clinical director of the National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children, a program of the Starr Global Learning Network, Caelan Kuban Soma offers these tips for understanding kids who have been through trauma, plus strategies for helping them.

1. Kids who have experienced trauma aren’t trying to push your buttons.
If a child is having trouble with transitions or turning in a folder at the beginning of the day, remember that children may be distracted because of a situation at home that is causing them to worry. Instead of reprimanding children for being late or forgetting homework, be affirming and accommodating by establishing a visual cue or verbal reminder to help that child. “Switch your mind-set and remember the kid who has experienced trauma is not trying to push your buttons,” says Soma.

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2. Kids who have been through trauma worry about what’s going to happen next.
A daily routine in the classroom can be calming, so try to provide structure and predictability whenever possible. Since words may not sink in for children who go through trauma, they need other sensory cues, says Soma. Besides explaining how the day will unfold, have signs or a storyboard that show which activity—math, reading, lunch, recess, etc.—the class will do when.

3. Even if the situation doesn’t seem that bad to you, it’s how the child feels that matters.
Try not to judge the trauma. As caring teachers, we may unintentionally project that a situation isn’t really that bad, but how the child feels about the stress is what matters most. “We have to remember it’s the perception of the child … the situation is something they have no control over, feeling that their life or safety is at risk,” says Soma. It may not even be just one event, but the culmination of chronic stress—for example, a child who lives in poverty may worry about the family being able to pay rent on time, keep their jobs or have enough food. Those ongoing stressors can cause trauma. “Anything that keeps our nervous system activated for longer than four to six weeks is defined as post-traumatic stress,” says Soma.

4. Trauma isn’t always associated with violence.
Trauma is often associated with violence, but kids also can suffer trauma from a variety of situations—like divorce, a move, or being overscheduled or bullied. “All kids, especially in this day and age, experience extreme stress from time to time,” says Soma. “It is more common than we think.”

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5. You don’t need to know exactly what caused the trauma to be able to help.
Instead of focusing on the specifics of a traumatic situation, concentrate on the support you can give children who are suffering. “Stick with what you are seeing now—the hurt, the anger, the worry,” Soma says, rather than getting every detail of the child’s story. Privacy is a big issue in working with students suffering from trauma, and schools often have a confidentiality protocol that teachers follow. You don’t have to dig deep into the trauma to be able to effectively respond with empathy and flexibility.

6. Kids who experience trauma need to feel they’re good at something and can influence the world.
Find opportunities that allow kids to set and achieve goals, and they’ll feel a sense of mastery and control, suggests Soma. Assign them jobs in the classroom that they can do well or let them be a peer helper to someone else. “It is very empowering,” says Soma. “Set them up to succeed and keep that bar in the zone where you know they are able to accomplish it and move forward.” Rather than saying a student is good at math, find experiences to let him or herfeel it. Because trauma is such a sensory experience, kids need more than encouragement—they need to feel their worth through concrete tasks.

7. There’s a direct connection between stress and learning.
When kids are stressed, it’s tough for them to learn. Create a safe, accepting environment in your classroom by letting children know you understand their situation and support them. “Kids who have experienced trauma have difficulty learning unless they feel safe and supported,” says Soma. “The more the teacher can do to make the child less anxious and have the child focus on the task at hand, the better the performance you are going to see out of that child. There is a direct connection between lowering stress and academic outcomes.”

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8. Self-regulation can be a major challenge for students suffering from trauma.
Some kids with trauma are growing up with emotionally unavailable parents and haven’t learned to self-soothe, so they may develop distracting behaviors and have trouble staying focused for long periods. To help them cope, schedule regular brain breaks. Tell the class at the beginning of the day when there will be breaks—for free time, to play a game or to stretch. “If you build it in before the behavior gets out of whack, you set the child up for success,” says Soma. A child may be able to make it through a 20-minute block of work if it’s understood there will be a break to recharge before the next task.

9. It’s OK to ask kids point-blank what you can do to help them make it through the day.
For all students with trauma, you can ask them directly what you can do to help. They may ask to listen to music with headphones or put their head on their desk for a few minutes. Soma says, “We have to step back and ask them, ‘How can I help? Is there something I can do to make you feel even a little bit better?’”

10. You can support kids with trauma even when they’re outside your classroom.
Loop in the larger school. Share trauma-informed strategies with all staff, from bus drivers to parent volunteers to crossing guards. Remind everyone: “The child is not their behavior,” says Soma. “Typically there is something underneath that driving that to happen, so be sensitive. Ask yourself, ‘I wonder what’s going on with that kid?’ rather than saying, ‘What’s wrong with the kid?’ That’s a huge shift in the way we view kids.”

Posted by: faithful | February 5, 2016

toxic triangles

One of the patterns in family and human systems is triangulation. It can at times be a healthy pattern, but in the way most family therapists use the term it refers to an unhealthy pattern in which there is an indirect coalescing of emotion, power and anxiety by one person and another in order to redirect or “fix” what another may have done or to hinder an action.

Transactional Analysis probably has done some of the most detailed illumination of how triangles can create toxic and harmful patterns of relationships. We have not spoken much (except in subtle ways) here about the problems of the victim, rescuer, persecutor vortex and how important it is to avoid attempting rescues, playing the victim or taking the role of critic/persecutor. This does not mean, of course, that we should not help others. Rescuing occurs when the individual being helped is acting helpless or refusing to take steps to help themselves. Friedman wrote about this in his fable about the first family. Sometimes, as Friedman points out in this fable, the authority sub-system (the parents in this case) can actually encourage or enable immature behavior of the perceived victim or persecutor.  

What is unique about triangulation patterns is that they always happen over time and narratives and stories emerge and build, waxing and waning and often peaking in a “switching of roles” and finally coming to a point of pleasure or despair.

Posted by: faithful | January 28, 2016

mindfulness “myths”

This is a flamboyant, oversimplified summary of mindfulness practice.  I am posting it for informational reasons only and do not endorse in any way its content.
6 Myths About Mindfulness We All Need to Stop Believing
01/13/2016 02:19 pm ET | Updated Jan 14, 2016
  • Cheryl Jones  Aetna Mindfulness Strategy Lead, MBSR trained

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